Through the Window: Seventeen Essays and a Short Story

Through the Window: Seventeen Essays and a Short Story

Title:Through the Window: Seventeen Essays and a Short Story
ISBN:9780345805515
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:272 pages

From the Man Booker Prize-winning author of The Sense of an Ending and one of Britain’s greatest writers: a brilliant collection of essays on the books and authors that have meant the most to him throughout his illustrious career.
 
In these seventeen essays (plus a short story and a special preface, “A Life with Books”), Julian Barnes examines the British, French and American writers who have shaped his writing, as well as the cross-currents and overlappings of their different cultures. From the deceptiveness of Penelope Fitzgerald to the directness of Hemingway, from Kipling’s view of France to the French view of Kipling, from the many translations of Madame Bovary to the fabulations of Ford Madox Ford, from the National Treasure status of George Orwell to the despair of Michel Houellebecq, Julian Barnes considers what fiction is, and what it can do. As he writes, “Novels tell us the most truth about life: what it is, how we live it, what it might be for, how we enjoy and value it, and how we lose it.”


    Through the Window: Seventeen Essays and a Short Story Reviews

  • Ilse

    Life and reading are not separate activities. When you read a great book, you don't escape from life, you plunge deeper into it. When I asked my daughter this weekend to make a collage out of the por...

  • Helle

    I basked delightedly in Julian Barnes’s writing in this book and realized, once again, that I feel so at ease in his company; he is intelligent, astute, eloquent, pleasant and often quite funny. In ...

  • Teresa

    Upon immediately finishing this book last night, I'd decided to write only a succinct review, something like:'I enjoyed this collection of essays, even the ones about authors I'd never heard of (i.e.,...

  • Julie

    The one lesson I can best take away from some of my recent readings is that I should let things simmer for a while before giving a rating. The usual Julie-knee-jerk reaction hasn't been working well, ...

  • Jonfaith

    "The most misspent day in any life is the one when you've failed to laugh." - ChamfortYesterday I first cracked the cover of this in Frankfort Airport, enjoying espresso as I gazed about at the number...

  • Cheryl

    Lurid post-it notes jostle pink-yellow-red-blue-green post-it flags at the page edges. I think only the five-star ones merit this number of flags. And — (sigh) — Barnes’s essays on writers and t...

  • Netta

    While reading this book, I was (and it seemed the most natural thing to do) composing my own essay. On Barnes, of course. Unfortunately, we don’t have any mutual friends (as far as I’m concerned a...

  • Roger Brunyate

     Living in Literature "If you go to the web page of the restaurant L'Huîtrière (3 rue des Chats Bossus, Lille) and click on 'translate', the zealous automaton you have stirred up will instantly ren...

  • Cynthia

    Francophile lit critI’m a Barnes fan so please forgive my fawning. This is not your stand literary criticism. Barnes focuses on less well known writers with some exceptions such as Updike, Orwell, a...

  • George

    A carefully, concisely, well written, thoughtful, interesting, reflective collection of seventeen essays and one short story. These 18 writing pieces were published over the period 1996 to 2011. The b...